Three southern Ontario men being fined a total of $10,000 for hunting violations.

The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry wants to remind hunters that shooting across a road is both dangerous and illegal.

An investigation by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry has resulted in three southern Ontario men being fined a total of $10,000 for hunting violations.

Ralph Rende of Kilworthy was fined $1,500 for discharging a firearm down a road, $1,000 for shooting a calf during the closed season, $1,000 for abandoning the calf, $1,000 for obstruction, and $750 for making a false statement to a conservation officer. Gennaro Genovese of Toronto was fined $1,500 for discharging a firearm down a road, $1,000 for shooting a calf during the closed season, and two fines of $750 for two counts of making a false statement to a conservation officer. Both men have also had their hunting licenses suspended for one-year or must take the Ontario Hunter Education Course to be able to apply for another hunting license.

Anthony Pansino of New Lowell was fined $750 dollars for making a false statement to a conservation officer.

Court heard that on October 17, 2018, Rende, Genovese and Pansino were moose hunting in the area of Silver Dollar. Pansino pushed a moose calf from the forest, out to the ditch of Highway 599, where Rende shot the calf twice, down and across the highway. Pushing is a term to describe a hunter walking through the woods, causing an animal to move in a direction away from that hunter, and in the direction of other hunters in the party. Rende inspected the moose and determined that it was a calf. The hunting party only had a valid tag for a cow; calf season was not open at the time. Rende abandoned the calf, and the three men left the scene. While driving home the next day, the men deposited the rifle in a lake along the route in an effort to obstruct the investigation.

Justice of the Peace Douglas Conley heard the case against Rende and Genovese in the Ontario Court of Justice, Bracebridge, on November 24, 2020. Justice of the Peace Michael Frederiksen heard the case against Pansino in the Ontario Court of Justice, Barrie, on January 24, 2020.

MNRF conservation officers continue to patrol and protect our natural resources during the current COVID-19 outbreak and would like to remind everyone that by respecting seasons, sanctuaries, bag and possession limits we all help ensure our natural resources stay healthy. Visit Ontario’s website to learn more about how the province continues to protect Ontarians from COVID-19.

To report a natural resource violation or provide information about an unsolved case, members of the public can call the ministry TIPS line toll free at 1-877-847-7667 or contact your local ministry office. You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS. For more information about unsolved cases, please visit ontario.ca/mnrftips.

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